Commitment and Consistency Lead To Marketing Results

I’m listening to a book called Influence at the moment. It’s an interesting listen. I’ve already gained several valuable nuggets around psychology that I’ll be putting to use in my marketing this year.

One principle covered in the book is the power of commitment & consistency. The basic idea is that when we come out and make a voluntary public commitment (especially in writing) we are far more likely to stick to our word.

Robert Cialdini, the author, discusses this principle from the standpoint of how it can be used to influence others. From war prisoners to alien chasing wackjobs, he provides several compelling examples that show how this principle shapes behavior.

Here’s the basic idea…

Get someone to voluntarily commit to something in public and they’ll back up that commitment with consistent action. Most people will remain consistent even if it makes them look like raving lunatics. The need for consistency overwhelms all other emotions and motivations.

Without knowing it, I’ve been using the commitment & consistency principle to become a better marketer.

I show up in the inbox of the lucky people on my email list every Friday because I want to remain consistent. I promise on The Recipe page of my website that I’ll be there every week with valuable marketing wisdom.

That public commitment led me to 52 emails last year. The act of making that promise right here on my website is a powerful motivator that keeps me moving forward every Friday regardless of what was going on around me.

How to use commitment & consistency in your marketing.

As you structure your masterful marketing plan for the year, pick a couple of specific areas where you want to make progress. Write down how you will execute. Now share that promise on your website or post it on social media.

Your need for consistency will drive you to deliver.

Speaking of delivering, I’ll deliver a holy sh!t marketing revelation to your inbox this Friday if you’d like. Simply visit this page and deposit your email address in the box.

By Andrew Holliday